Jump to content


Photo

Pre-Beginner Astro-photography


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 BABFB

BABFB

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 97 posts

Posted 05 February 2013 - 06:31 PM

Let me preface my statement w/ I know absolutely nothing about this subject. I have a small cheap astro-camera, but the owners manual is woefully
inadequate. No explanations, just descriptions. There is a thread in here somewhere posted by Phil, can't finds it, but what I need is a mag., or book explaining in novice terms about Blue, Red, Green filters, Gamma, Analog, Temperature, all these settings I know nothing about. I guess what
I am looking for is Astro-Photography for Dummies. I'm thinking I should be able to take an image of M-42 w/ this little cheap camera but as of yet nothing. I do not know what I am doing here. Think I will try and use 'Capture Video' and see if I can use that to invoke a Time Exposure longer than
the 2 second Image Capture. Any ideas on some layman terms explanations on this stuff? Thanks.
  • deepwaterescue4u, Bluheneni, beegainge and 1 other like this

#2 deepwaterescue4u

deepwaterescue4u

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 146 posts

Posted 05 February 2013 - 06:52 PM

When you find out let me know too...
Terry

Meade LX200 10" ACF GPS
Meade 4 speed microfocuser
Vixen flip mirror
Milburn Wedge
Panama City Florida

Live long and prosper

#3 gspie

gspie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 296 posts
  • LocationScottsdale, Arizona

Posted 06 February 2013 - 07:24 AM

Why not give us the name/model number so we might be able to do a quick google search to see the manual/specs of the camera.
Ron Wodaski (I think that is the spelling) has a few books on astro-photography, here is a link to his site: http://www.newastro.com/
  • BABFB likes this
LX850 with 10" ACF OTA and Takahashi FS 60C OTA -- SBIG STT-8300M CCD with FW8G-STT Self Guiding Filter Wheel and SBIG AO-8 Adaptive Optics -- Camera Control and Image Calibration with Maxim DL/CCD Pro, Image processing with PixInsight, and final composition with Photoshop CS5

http://home.comcast....ie/astroweb.htm

#4 BABFB

BABFB

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 97 posts

Posted 06 February 2013 - 04:39 PM

gspie, Thanks for the advice and links. I bought this camera online knowing it was primarily designed for microscopes, but it did say it could be used in telescopes. Here is a link to what I am using. Maybe you can determine if I need a bigger better camera. But this one might work if I knew what I was doing. hehe Thanks again.
http://touptek.en.al...ece_Camera.html

#5 BABFB

BABFB

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 97 posts

Posted 06 February 2013 - 04:57 PM

gspie, Looks like I will be purchasing Ron's book 'The New CCD Astronomy.' That appears to be EXACTLY what I was looking for. Thank You very much for the Heads Up.

#6 BABFB

BABFB

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 97 posts

Posted 06 February 2013 - 08:26 PM

Oh, And, I do have a small scope. 135mm, so I do understand that aspect of it. That's where I do not have enough practical knowledge to know where I'm at, not knowing which direction to go. But I will learn. hehe

#7 BABFB

BABFB

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 97 posts

Posted 06 February 2013 - 08:37 PM

Well, here it is, MEADE LXD-55 w/ a 135mm tube my Dad informed me of in a pawn shop. I have that little camera in this setup.

Attached Thumbnails

  • IMAG00061.JPG


#8 gspie

gspie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 296 posts
  • LocationScottsdale, Arizona

Posted 07 February 2013 - 06:39 AM

from the looks of it, it appears to be like a web-cam. It may not capture long-exposure images (I cannot tell from the web site). It looks like this can be used while observing and you wanted to show it on your computer as you observe - not sure the chip is sensitive enough or large enough for DSO photography. You can try to view something big and bright, like a planet or the moon. The moon may be best start because that is easy enough to get in the FOV and give you a shot at focusing it -- once you have it focused, then you can try some DSOs (like the Orion Nebula -- still fairly bright).
LX850 with 10" ACF OTA and Takahashi FS 60C OTA -- SBIG STT-8300M CCD with FW8G-STT Self Guiding Filter Wheel and SBIG AO-8 Adaptive Optics -- Camera Control and Image Calibration with Maxim DL/CCD Pro, Image processing with PixInsight, and final composition with Photoshop CS5

http://home.comcast....ie/astroweb.htm

#9 BABFB

BABFB

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 97 posts

Posted 07 February 2013 - 06:12 PM

from the looks of it, it appears to be like a web-cam. It may not capture long-exposure images (I cannot tell from the web site). It looks like this can be used while observing and you wanted to show it on your computer as you observe - not sure the chip is sensitive enough or large enough for DSO photography. You can try to view something big and bright, like a planet or the moon. The moon may be best start because that is easy enough to get in the FOV and give you a shot at focusing it -- once you have it focused, then you can try some DSOs (like the Orion Nebula -- still fairly bright).

gspie, What it really boils down to is budget. I did not do the proper research really, but I do not have the funds for a Mallencam either. Although, the 9 Grand I am spending on dental implants would go a LOOOOOONG way on a tube and camera. hehe So, using this time to learn, and your recent post has helped tremendously on this Avenue.

#10 gspie

gspie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 296 posts
  • LocationScottsdale, Arizona

Posted 07 February 2013 - 06:21 PM

I hear a lot of people are doing things with web cams that were only available to ccd's a few years ago. Once you get it focused on the moon, it may be an inexpensive enter onto Astrophotography, which can get pricey once you start getting better mounts and bigger cameras. Good luck!
LX850 with 10" ACF OTA and Takahashi FS 60C OTA -- SBIG STT-8300M CCD with FW8G-STT Self Guiding Filter Wheel and SBIG AO-8 Adaptive Optics -- Camera Control and Image Calibration with Maxim DL/CCD Pro, Image processing with PixInsight, and final composition with Photoshop CS5

http://home.comcast....ie/astroweb.htm

#11 BABFB

BABFB

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 97 posts

Posted 07 February 2013 - 06:28 PM

And I do go to the Night Skies website to see what those guys are doing, watch, and listen to commentary to try and pick something up there.

#12 Philip Pugh

Philip Pugh

    Sir Philip Pugh, AKA Astrochav

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 882 posts
  • LocationBased in South West England but could be anywhere

Posted 12 February 2013 - 05:17 AM

I hear a lot of people are doing things with web cams that were only available to ccd's a few years ago. Once you get it focused on the moon, it may be an inexpensive enter onto Astrophotography, which can get pricey once you start getting better mounts and bigger cameras. Good luck!


I'm getting shots of Jupiter when the weather is clear and have done some experimental shots of the Pleiades. It's been thick cloud here for days but I'm planning a go at using a focal reducer on a short tube refractor. There is a bit of a learning curve.

#13 Philip Pugh

Philip Pugh

    Sir Philip Pugh, AKA Astrochav

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 882 posts
  • LocationBased in South West England but could be anywhere

Posted 12 February 2013 - 05:18 AM

I'd start off by pointing a compact digital camera through the eyepiece. I co-wrote a book on it and there's a ;lot you can do with this.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users